Blog  Statement on Racial Justice

Statement on Racial Justice

My NFTY Ohio Valley community,

Our country is broken. Right now, we live in a world of hate and injustice. This isn’t new; America was built on the foundation of white privilege. Throughout history, minorities, more specifically, the Black Community, have been met with violence and oppression, all because of the color of their skin. The recent murders of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and George Floyd by the police have brought our country to its breaking point. They are among other Black Americans who are victims of police brutality. Though it’s scary and difficult, I have hope. I have hope, because with all of us speaking up and taking action, REAL change is possible. As Jews, we have an obligation to stand up to injustice, and be advocates. Jewish text teaches, Tzedek, tzedek tirdof--"Justice, justice you shall pursue" (Deuteronomy 16:20). It’s not just our obligation as Jews, it’s our obligation as people and as citizens of this country. We are leaders and allies, and we cannot stay silent. No one should have to wake up in the morning and be scared that they may not make it home. It is imperative that we come together as a community to be advocates and to stand against hate. If we all take action in the ways we are each able, we can work together to promote change.

“History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.” - Martin Luther King Jr.

By: Macey Goorevich, NFTY Ohio Valley Social Action Vice President

Resources for Action

The first step in taking action is to learn what you can do, as well as educating yourself of racial justice. See below for a list of resources compiled by NFTYites:

Ways to take action as a Jewish community:

 

Be Civically Engaged:

 

Resources to take action:

 

An Example Script for Making Phone Calls:

  • Hi, my name is _____ from _____ and I am calling on behalf of George Floyd and the injustice that he faced. People in the black community have been victimised by members of the police force for years. Enough is enough, I demand that we push reforms to end police brutality. *I was nervous the first time I called my Senators. Following a script is very helpful*

 

Make calls and send emails to the Minnesota community: 

  • Governor Tim Waltz, Minnesota Governor: (612) 201-3400
  • Mayor Jacob Frey, Mayor of Minneapolis: (612) 673-2100
  • District Attorney Mike Freeman: (612) 348-5550
  • Police Chief Arradondo: (612) 673-2735
  • Sheriff Hutchinson: (612) 348-3744
  • Minneapolis PD: (612) 673-3000
  • Minneapolis Dept. of Civil Rights: (612) 673-3012
  • police@minneapolism.gov
  • policereview@minneapolismn.gov
  • minneapolis311@minneapolism.gov

 

Contact your representatives: 

  • Letter to your Representatives
    • *Put in your information and send a letter to your reps. The letter is pre- written by the RAC, but you can edit it or write your own if you wish.*

Ohio:

  • Governor: Mike DeWine (614) 466-3555
  • Mayor: 
    • Cincinnati: John Cranley (513) 352-35250
    • Columbus: Andre Ginther (614) 645-7671

 

Indiana:

Kentucky:

 

Tennessee:

 

Tips for Effective Communication with Congress:

 

Register to Vote:

 

Donate: 

 

Books to Read:
Black Feminist Thought – Patricia Hill Collins
Me and White Supremacy – Layla F. Saad
Heavy: An American Memoir – Kiese Laymon
So You Want to Talk About Race – Ijeoma Oluo
Between the World and Me – Ta-Nehisi Coates
How to Be Antiracist – Ibrham X. Kendi
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sing – Maya Angelou

 

Podcasts to Listen to:
1619 – NY Times
About Race
The Diversity Gap
Intersectionality Matters! Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw
Momentum: A Race Forward Podcast

Films to Watch:
13th (Netflix)
The Hate U Give (Hulu)
When They See Us (Netflix)
American Son (Netflix)
If Beale Street Could Talk (Hulu)